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? his budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly specter of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levisohn delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press. >> the queen sits in on a cabinet meeting at number 10. but let's begin with the subject which has dominated politics and our pockets for many months, the state of our economy. at the start of december the chancellor came to deliver his autumn statement or mini budget. it set out the latest figures for the growth, tax and benefits. among the headlines the scrapping of a planned rise in fuel tax. a 1% rise in working benefits an increase at the threshold in which people begin to pay tax. he would have to extend austerity measures until 2015. >> the deficit is coming down, coming down this year and every year of this parliament. yes, the deficit is far too high for comfort. we cannot relax our efforts to make our economy safe. but britain
. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand on his way back from s
of the meeting point between europe and asia. and has always developed, was developed as a center of trade and commerce. that continued, of course throughout the centuries into the 20th century, and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, it's also larger than the capital, damascus, not by much but it's a very large city. it's not just the second city. so has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred because it was historically quite a vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> where are you from originally? >> i am lebanese, but my mother is sick and spent an lebanon supported history, correct? >> right spent is there a lot of trade between lebanon -- how would you describe lebanon's economy? >> it's going to take up to saturday because the lebanese economy is really very difficult to describe the nominally it's an open capitalist economy, but the kinds of networks and crony network, that exist in lebanon, turned this kind
rea. >> hillary clinton earlier this month. it is believed it was while on her trip to europe that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this bill york hospital, receiving medication, and will remain here for the next 48 hours at least. she has been offered for the past three weeks. her illness prevented her from testifying before congress about the attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi. that killed the ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. the department faced severe criticism. mrs. clinton who is the most traveled secretary of state in u.s. history is due to step down in the new year. many democrats want her to run for the presidency in 2016. her health is likely to be a major factory in making any decision. >> concerned about the health of the venezuelan president hugo chÁvez, suffering of further complications after ca
europe. and these guys are good. eventually they will develop an icbm that could reach the united states. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though t
, equities in the u.s. keep clear of europe for now. i think high yield debt will be interesting. within equities, if the economy starts really growing it will be more broad-based and people can move away from the more conservative investments and go into more cyclical as well as smaller cap stocks. >> optimistic view on 2013 from alison deans. always good to see you. >> thank you. >>> when we return on "the wall street journal report," maria will be back gazing into the crystal ball of 2013. what the new year may bring to wall street, to washington, and to your wallet. predictions and analysis to get you to january 1st and beyond. and then later, what a ride it's been. some of the biggest names and stories and ideas that made the 12 months of 2012. as we go to the break, a look at how the stock market ended the week. >>> another new year's eve approaches and instead of resolutions we're making bets and predictions for 2013 for washington, wall street, and around the world. joining me now is "the washington post"'s ezra klein and yahoo! finance senior columnist mike santoli. mike, the po
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
desperate for the united states to open a second front in western europe and the british, and roosevelt asked stotland to send the top general to washington in nabf 42 and in june of 40 to the issue a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly. and yet the open up in june of 44. that's partly because the british refused to go along with this and that the british get involved in the periphery in northern africa. they are serious but they didn't open up the second front with the united states brought instead basically to defend the provision higher. >> how does this link to the cold war? >> there's been to the mistrust between the soviets beginning during the war treatise of the seeds of the cold war are visible during the war. there are certain tensions of course because the fact that they delayed the second front know that the soviets had on their own largely defeated the germans after stalin and rather what pushing it across central europe and eastern europe moving towards berl
for the united states to open up a second front in western europe, and the british and roosevelt asked stalin to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the brit
likely signal a partial shift away from her hard line stance on europe. and more danger may lie in wait for merkel outside of the country. merkel may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, sovereign debt and banking crisis, but the problems are far from over. >> we are still in the financial crisis and we don't know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy will be a serious problem. >> 2013 may also be the year when germany starts to feel what much of the rest of europe has suffered through, the pain of a recession.
in europe. but many small investors have missed out on the market's gains this year. on the whole, they've taken money out of stocks, and put it into bonds. >> small investors have become dubious of equities because essentially from 1999 until the beginning of this year, there was no return on equities. they feel they're at a disadvantage to institutional investors and computerized trading. the economy has been lackluster. >> reporter: some of the most aggressive stock buyers have been institutional investors and hedge funds-- searching for ways to make money in a low interest rate environment. many international investors also bought us stocks-- seeing them as more attractive alternatives to investments in emerging markets and europe. >> stocks won by default. it was the last remaining standing asset where you could get some dividend yield. where you could get a little bit of earnings growth. and where quality companies could deliver you a higher ann tt jthinpuusurttg urtn than just putting your money in cash or bonds. >> reporter: some of the credit for the rally also goes to u.s. co
for 2012, up the russell 2000 up 12 percentage points, the s&p up 31, -- s&p up 11. but it's europe, europe actually ended up looking pretty darn good. germany up 30%. i mean, i look at that, and i say all of the fear that was out there including the euro stocks, 600 did unbelievably beautifully. and you say, my goodness, if you went toward the worst, most fearsome place, europe, you would have done way better than here in the u.s.. >> yeah, absolutely. well, it's like everything that happens in nature as well as the markets and the equity markets. when things get stretched too far one way, they will come back to a happy medium. we saw that in the equity markets this year. they were the best performing asset classes of all the places you could put your money, and it's not without knowing what's going on when you had unprecedented types of money flows coming from central banks around the globe, that money had to go somewhere. the u.s. market has performed very well. by the time we get done today, especially on the fiscal cliff talks, we're going to be up about 14% in the s&p 500. the leaders
are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important thing inability or reduced ability to divide one's ability. >> it's less debilitating than alcohol. canadian study shows those driving within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another affect that we see are those driving under marijuana reduced ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i feel we are in unchartered territory. >> the limit is five nanograms per blood sample. impairment is equal to alcohol. >> heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> to say that two hits or two dosals would get me 5 nangram, it is impossible to make that. >> the compound in pot is thc, and it's stored in fat. user could test positive weeks after smoking. bottom line this is going to be argued and litigated. in alcohol we started at is 1.5 and game down
an extended victory tour wowing fans across europe, but his first stop was the party are at rebel headquarters. he knows that seymour can trust are key components to peak performance. >> to look back what we have achieved as a team in the last three-four years, it is the emotions we have, believing until the last lap of the race that they could not be crazier. in the end, the winner takes at all. it's just tastes of the best when you are on the top step. >> they will be a try to keep together their winning team. he will be extending his contract until 2014 with rebel racing. -- red bull racing. >> much more after the break. >> including the eu address. stay with us. >> if you have never traveled around the country, you have probably climbed on to retrain. >> trains could just about everywhere in the national network has enjoyed competition protection for decades which has ended and long-distance domestic bus services taking into the road. >> the passengers are tired on this bus from frankfurt to berlin, but many welcome the new long distance lines as an alternative to trains. >> it is cheaper,
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
german blue chips, especially when you consider the fact that we are in and out of recession in europe, we have a real malaise in front of a lot of sectors such as the carmakeres and that hasn't stopped the likes of vw, the likes of porsche, the likes of bmw having a very strong 2012. that's despite the fact that gm's opel said it will cut capacity by 20% in 2013. so we are seeing at the moment a real complacency regarding the fiscal cliff, but it's low volumes here as we enter the last hour or so of trading. back to you. >> we also have some news to bring you, broken last night. i expect john harwood talked about it on the special that we did last night. secretary of state hillary clinton is in a new york hospital this morning being treated from a blood clt clot resulting from a concussion you suffered earlier this month. she had been expected to return to work this week. >>> coming up, deal or no deal? we're going to look beyond the fiscal cliff and what it will mean for the markets. we have jim o'neill. he's going to join us to talk about whether he is bullish for the start of 2013
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
" kim in third. >>> sales of champagne going flat in europe. with the continent's ongoing economic problems give them not a lot of reasons to pop open the bottles. >> open the prosecco. it's ten bucks a bottle and tastes almost the same. >>> when we come back, new threats against americans from one of al qaeda's most ruthless branches. >>> who is rolling into the playoffs in the nfl? stay with us to find out. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] nothing gets you going quite like the power of quaker oats. today is going to be epic. quaker up. [ woman ] too weak. wears off. been there. tried that. ladybug body milk? no thanks. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. it's so powerful you can skip a day... but light enough you won't want to. dermatologist recommended eucerin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. you're always on, so we're always ready. tyson grilled & ready chicken. no preservatives, 98% fat free, and fully cooked. we'll take care
in europe there is a risk of social explosion in greece. >> you can still hear the gunfire being fired over the heads of the protesters, as well as heavy tier grass -- teargas shelling, but the crowd is energetic and young. >> until today, this was an atlantic city, new jersey -- this was the boardwalk in atlantic city, new jersey. hurricane sandy made by a work of it, turning it to rubble -- made light work of it, turning it to rubble. >> in the coming weeks and months, i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties. >> when adults bury a child, it goes against the laws of nature. these children will never grow to be adults. >> the air side rent is going on now. we are going to -- air siren is going on now. we are going to duck. there's usually about 20 seconds, 15 seconds. >> the new chinese chief is revealed. >> i designed it. >> the expedition to an island of ice that broke off. >> previously, both factions had tried hard to avoid such confrontation. the muslim brotherhood and the opposition are urging supporters on to the same streets on the same day. sil
and europe. >> this is san francisco with the largest armenian food festival and widely recognized as one of the best food festivals in the area. we have vendors that come up from fresno, los angeles. we have everyone here in the neighborhood. that's really what it is, is drawing people to see a little bit of our culture and experience what we experience weekend in and weekend out. >> we are behind the scenes now watching the chef at work preparing some delicious armenian. this is a staple in armenian cooking, right? >> absolutely since the beginning of time. soldiers used to skewer it on swords. we have chicken ka bob, beef, lam, onions, parsley, over 2 pounds of meat being cooked in three days. >> after all that savory pro seen, i was ready to check out the fresh veggie options. * protein this is armenian. tomatoes and olive oil, that makes it summer food. what i'm doing is i'm putting some latinae. it's kind of like cream cheese without. when they offer you food, you have to eat it. they would welcome you and food is very important for them. >> in every armenian community we feel like
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
of europe. some of the last places will be the american sew mow ya. they don't start until 6 a.m. our time tomorrow morning. >>> coming up tonight after world knew, stay tuned for abc2's the list. >> picture this. we take you behind the scenes for flashes of hope at johns hopkins hospital and what goes into making the perfect cupcake flavor. wool. >> let you know tonight on the list. >> here's what's coming up tonight on abc2. irene, drop the itch. we dropped the itch, you can too. with maximum strength scalpicin®. it's not a shampoo so you can stop intense itch fast, wherever you are. i dropped the itch. free yourself from embarrassing scalp itch. ximum strength scalpicin®. also available scalpicin® 2 in 1, itch relief plus dandruff control. >>> people are bundling up. >> a cold night, what we always hope for is no weather to douse our flames. >> it has happened before but not this time. >> maryland's most powerful radar is dry as we go to scrums under six -- just under six hours. we could wake up to a few flurries. what a way to bring in the new year. >> thanks a lot. that as all the
. it could be another three to six months could go to a zoo in europe, australia, where wherever it might be, to keep the gene pool fresh. these animals are so rare we have to know exactly the breeding program. >> why are you not remotely scared of them? >> it's not a matter -- that's a good question. people ask me if i'm scared. if i find myself afraid or scared, that means i'm going the wrong thing. they know the animal very well, so i've been around them. i don't raise them like these guys do, but having raised tigers, my wife and i have raised, tigers, lions, leopards, everything in your 40 years of marriage. so you know cats when you do that much. see how he's licking me? if that were a full-grown tiger, piers, in less than three minutes he could lick me to the bone. that's how rough the tongue gets. sand paper like you wouldn't believe. >> when they're full sized, how many are left in the world? two to 400. that's all there is. >> two of the last remaining siberian tigers. >> in the zoo world we do quite well with them. in india, the bengal tiger, seen them take down a water buffalo in
another item, i think. we are building now in europe a house. 2 is important for us to have such an incredible opportunity, a platform where we perform op ra, sim fonic music, educational projects will go up immediately because all the schools, universities, city of five million people. you can perform one leg nut cracker 20 time ace year, you can perform 50 times a year, each of those 50 nuts crackers a year you can devote 40 to schools it is a huge opportunity to help young people understand their part draft decision. because of course they have all these toys and also kid does it all the time but they will go for the first time at 8 or 9 years old to see the magic of theatre. most of them will come back, we know that most of them will come back. it's much easy everto start at 8, 9, 10 and then understand ballet, opera, theatre, music, rather than do it when are you 25, 30 for its first time. it's too late, maybe. >> back to politics for a moment. when you look at russia today, democracy, economic growth, human rights, press freedom. where do you think they are on those is
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints, kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact, upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation, thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet, so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their hopes were going to be realized. and so it really did put a lot of people in motion during
&p looks attractive. the other thing is the policy mandate in places like europe believe it or not for the first time in a really long time they actually may be clearer than the u.s. >> chris, is there something about the fiscal cliff, deal or no deal, that makes you concerned about u.s. equities versus international ones? >> well, yes. but i think it's a relative concern. because i think risk assets around the world are attractively valued right now. but you're absolutely right. regardless of what sort of deal we get today or in the next three months, the fact of the matter is it will have an adverse impact next year. the question is is it going to be bad enough to throw the country into recession or not? we suspect not. and you're seeing today that it looks like a -- that both political sides have been able to find common ground on the tax issue which we think is pertinent in erm thes of the economic impact. but having said that, again, the policy response we think in europe ever since draghi has been in has been consistent and very conducive to risk markets going up. >
. global travel company, expedia.com. recently announced they're growing in europe. seagate technology has a 5% dividend and a plan to cut the number of outstanding shares. and ebay could well be positioned to take advantage of the trend. now apple, despite a tough quarter, the launches of the iphone 5 and the ipad mini helped them return over 30% this year. though it's been a tough three months. it wasn't all positive in tech for everyone. marvel technology group down. the chip company hurt by a ruling against them in a lawsuit. hewlett-packard hurt. most recently because of possible accounting issues. and dell hurt by a pc industry that has well passed its prime. they've been looking to more of a services driven business. the biggest ipos of the year didn't turn out as spectacularly. facebook shares went down to 26.60 today. >> love that. thank you. >>> the nasdaq did better than the dow in 2012 and even better than the s&p 500. so now let's get tech predictions for next year and hold on to your hats, guys. because they range from microsoft taking over rim to twitter going public. great
: i have seen people wait an hour to see, in effect words. if you go to ancient cathedrals in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that are expressed in worsd. and so it makes sense that people would look at these words, as i said, to try to tell white house we are and the kinds of things we hope to be. so yes, words mean a great deal to americans and always have. >> suarez: looking back at the proclamation itself, as a practical matter, what did that declaration do for people still in bondage in the confederates. >> it reconfirmed their idea that the war was about the end of slavery. and, in fact upon hearing these words and understanding of the proclamation thousands of african-americans left plantations. they voted with their feet so to speak, to say that this was going to be a new day. so the proclamation gave them hope that all of their
's a little like, you know, the old communist eastern europe. big brother is watching you all the time. >> well, maybe big brother should be watching because we have to eliminate that problem. >> even it if means-- means snooping into their private lives? >> i don't snoop into their private life. when they leave here, i don't follow them. >> well, you do after a fashion. >> well, our policy does. >> and you are the policy. >> yeah, that's right. i'm the policymaker. yes, sir. >> after this story first aired in 2005, howard weyers began charging his employees more for healthcare costs if their spouses smoked, even if those spouses weren't covered by weyco's insurance. and the national healthcare legislation passed in 2010 endorsed many of the practices in this story, allowing bigger incentives for employees who enroll in wellness programs and higher costs for those who do not change their behavior. [clocking ticking] >> i just emailed you the link. >> when 60 minutes on cnbc returns, we'll meet people who are constantly attached to their mobile devices. >> oh, i have the absolute bare m
the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are gl
. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of
but europe is kind of on the vanguard of the secularism movement, and to the degree that their leading religious institution looks irrelevant or out of step with the times, i think that there's important lessons for us here about how religious groups and religious institutions accommodate themselves to the wider culture and one of the things that you're gonna see that on here at home, i think in 2013, is the gay marriage question, which is gonna be headed to the supreme court. so to what degree religious institutions can adapt to the larger culture is i think gonna be, there's gonna be a lot there. >> but for a lot of these religious institutions they don't adapt to the wider culture. you know, they take pride in saying, "well, we're counter cultural because we stand for what we believe is right, whether or not the culture agrees." and i think you're right. that's where it really, you know. >> that's where the tension is. >> the clash comes when you talk about gay marriage because for a lot of religious institutions this is a faith issue, an issue of morality. they see god ordaining ma
: clinton develops a stomach virus was on that trip to europe and had to cancel a subsequent visit to morocco. a few days later back in the u.s. she fainted and fell. her aides say it was the result of dehydration. on december 15 the state department announced that clinton had sustained a concussion in that fall. doctors recommended, quote, that the secretary continue to rest and avoid any strenuous activity and strongly advised her to cancel all work events for the coming week. clinton canceled the december 20 appearance before a congressional committee to testify about the attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi. she also missed the december 21 nomination of senator john kerry to succeed her. on december 27, the state department announced that clinton would return to work in the new year. it was three days later when her spokesperson said she had been hospitalized. secretary clinton had a blood clot once before in 1998 as first lady. she said she developed one in her leg from her nonstop flying around the country. as secretary of state that nonstop travel continued. she visited 11
will be up to 20%. our major trading partners, britain and europe and cada -- they are only 16%. so there is a very good reason why just about every industrial country has a really low capital gains tax rate. that's because policymakers just about everywhere know that low capital gains tax rates are crucial for a growth of economy and entrepreneurship and high-technology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the flow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every major high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so wt we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: let's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxation. >> that's right. corporate
in europe on the big 75% tax rate that the french wanted to pass for the rich. >> the breaking news that a french court said a 75% tax rate on individuals is unfair. so it has been rejected. the court court says unless you apply it to households it is not fair to single out individuals. that means 75% tax at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in t
and a letter of introduction from the british governor of bombay have been critical to the passage into europe. whatever their private feelings about the barrage, they say the criticism of imperialism for french and china with a claim to encounter racism unparalleled. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equipment for grown men of the boy scouts. and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians them especially parsi's. i consequence of empire and a kind of counterweight to it. a different diaspora, and yet similar manifestations of internationalism supported -- this is in the clutches of circumnavigators. this internationalism supported him on his later circus to of the worker he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during the country's revolution. as a white russian, soboleff was a man without a country. so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland in a mix of men and women cast off clothing. in shanghai he obtained a passport, a document that the league of nations had begun to is
in europe is something elsewhere, because of the euro situation, you have to cut people's wages, to make those countries competitive again. that's a completely different issue. austerity in terms of reversing this tremendous increase we've had in government spending over the last four years, we've gone from 2.9 trillion to 3.8 trillion in spending, a 30 odd percent increase in four years. and there's no trend or motivation so far to reverse that or normalize that. so again, austerity for the public sector is stimulus for the private sector. >> all right. shawn tully, thank you very much. >> happy new year, don. >> you too as well. >> thank you, don. >>> a mom and her kids reunited after they had been missing for nearly a week, thanks to a cnn viewer. thanks to you. hear their story next. hes, fev. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> it unfolded right here on cnn cnn. teresa nash came on our show making a desperate plea for help to find her two missing boys.
advantage of the rest of the world besides america and europe that are on fire. we will be lucky to escape a double dip recession. we will bump along the road. >> you are not satisfied this is the new normal? >> no, capitalism is just trying to survive by the skin of its teeth. >> great stuff, guys. the president today not giving republicans an inch for spending cuts. >> if republicans think i won't finish the job -- will finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts if they think that is the formula if how we solve this thing, they have another thing coming. that is not how it will work. >> and ed henry on how this is playing out. that is your take on how close we may or may not be to a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? >>guest: we have a framework on taxes. they are working out a deal on the massive spending hikes. taking an amount to it as the president said, not a scalpel and it could be too deep. we are a way of from dealing with that. but i make the point that it is still not clear whether a deal like this could make it through the senate. it seems likely the republican lea
to you. europe has seen its own budget crisis over the past few years. are there any valuable take aways that lawmakers in the u.s. could use as guidance? >> i'm not sure. i thought very long and hard since i knew we were discussing this for parallels. and i think what you really come down to is that of compromise. and the ability to do a deal. when in the face of opposition, you just have to get something done because the ramifications are so serious if you don't. in the case of the eurozone, you had 27 countries and nobody could agree and you had different political philosoph s philosophies. that sounds similar to the fiscal cliff and certainly the eurozone pushed things to the absolute limit. almost to breaking point during the summer where again and again they would not agree until disaster was on their doorstep. that's the similarity to what we're seeing tonight. >> i know. we're hearing that negotiations are ongoing. they are continuing. there are a number of issues on both sides. ryan lizza following this. it appears as though obviously some elements of this have to be pushed for
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